Sunday, October 14, 2007

You know you live in Kentucky when...

Kentuckyisms:
  • first off, Louisville is pronounced "Lou-ah-vull". If you're gonna live here you have to get that one down first...and quick.
  • Other pronunciations that have particularly annoyed me are stated as followed: pen is pronounced pin, hour is pronounced hrrrr, older is pronounced odor well, there are more I just can't think of any right now. I'll edit this later, I'm sure.
  • Idea always has an "r" on the end.
Around town:
  • The only way to get chili is with spaghetti in it.
  • Turn signal are useless to Kentuckians.
  • There are these multi-colored horse statues are all over the place...I still have to figure out what they're for.
  • When your car gives you trouble just park on the side of the road...and let me tell ya, I've never seen so many broke down old cars on the side of the highway before!
  • Braden works at the Panera Bread in Indiana, which is only about 10-15 minutes from our apartment, but when you tell people that, they really look at you funny, like you're crazy for even crossing the bridge to Indiana. They think people from Indiana are the REAL hicks!
  • There's only one kind of tea around here and it's sweet. And everyone drinks tea, I've seen 2 years olds drink it!
  • Almost every other commercial on TV or the radio is for lawyers.
  • People ignore "no smoking" signs, they think they're just there to make a select few people happy.
  • When people ask you where you live, they mean what county are you in.
  • We didn't move here until after, but as I hear, the second Saturday in May, you're at the Derby...unless you're crazy.
Sports:
  • College sports are HUGE! Mainly football, and basketball and there's only two teams you're allowed to vote for: University of Louisville Cardinals or Kentucky State Wildcats. Red vs. Blue...and everyone and their grandma roots for either one of these teams...if you don't care, that means you're not from around these parts.
  • Did I mention college sports are huge? There are no other sports!

13 comments:

kazukikamikazi said...

The horses were government project they had the horses made and local artist bidded on them to receive one to paint, I think it's modeled after Chicago where they have painted/decorated bulls/cows. Actually most Kentuckians only attend the Derby if their placing bets, other than that we stay home and let the tourist deal with that mess. And, the wildcats are from University of Kentucky, UK, Kentucky State is different school.

Anonymous said...

Thank you!! :o)

Anonymous said...

I've lived in Kentucky all my life,
there is not broke down cars everywhere, if your car broke down wouldn't you go to the side of the road too? unless your ignorant and want to get hit. I'm pretty sure you can ask for iced tea too. You can get chili anywhere or make it yourself. I personally have never seen a multi-colored horse statue anywhere and i've been here for a while. Pen and pin are pronounced the same anyways. I've never said hrrr instead of hour in my life and me or anyone else i know says Idea with an r on the end. get your facts straight.

k, thanks.

Anonymous said...

one thing, we all walk around with shoes on. and yes every mile or so on the interstate there are at least 5 broken down cars.St.X vs. Trinity is also very big. When asked where you went to school they mean high school.)presentation, sacred heart, st.X, holy Cross...etc.)

Anonymous said...

mmhhhmmm..yeah...most of us speak very differently and weirdly..the horses are fun to look at..and theres different pronouncitations of words everywhere

Anonymous said...

rival is Uk not K state.

Anonymous said...

Born and raised in Louisville and the Derby is the first Saturday in May

Anonymous said...

I would like you to know that I live in Breathitt County Kentucky. Yes my county was featured on American Idol. First off, there must be a state called Kentucky in some other plac ebecause I don't know anyone who has ever done anything that goes by these lies. Also when people talk about my area being in poverty, those people either have been here and show the worst areas possible or only believe the lies others tell them. Poverty is not a very large issue here.I would like to talk about the Bronx. Yes in NYC. The poverty the drug issus! I mean good god! I wouldn't wish that on anyone. See what I mean? Other places have there downs also. I think it is important for people to understand that the southern people would come out on top during terrible times. If you haven't noticed, people of our area are ussually kind and have good communication skills. Also we are very good at surviving in terrible conditions. Ever heard of gone with the wind? Did Scarlett O'Hara die in the awful happenings? Of Course not. So while you spend your day in your subarban area where you have taxis. I will live in my subarban area and ride my bike to Dillard's or maybe JCPennys. But there is always that chance I will text my friends and meet them at the mall.

Sexi Sybil said...

I've live in Ky for almost 20 years. And you can get chili without spaghetti in it. I like traveling and Ive been to enough places to be able to tell you this turn signals are useless to everyone now adays. I dont know what part of ky you was at but ive never seen a whole bunch of cars parked cars on the side of the road. I've only seen a couple at a time. About the sweet tea not everyone drinks it. I prefer unsweetened. And you can get more then just sweet tea around here. I guess you dont watch alot of tv nor listen to alot of music on the radio because not every other commercial is for lawyers. For the sports all sport are huge around here not just college sports. And you can vote for any team you want to. the only reason it seems like its uk against uofl is because both teams are from Ky. oh yeah and the whole if you dont like it then you're not from around these parts is completely wrong. I hate most sports except volleyball.

You should get your facts straight!

alyshayhan said...

My Mawmaw does make her chili with spaghetti, and I never understood that and she's the only person I know who makes it that way. I call it spaghetti with beans. And anyone who lives on the border of Kentucky like I did with Evansville, IN like 20 minutes away knows it's completely common for everyone to drive over there. My Mawmaw comes to Evansville to shop every week. I now live in Evansville. Sweet tea really isn't just a southern thing everyone drinks it but yes we do love it! And yes the rivalry between Louisville Cardinals and the University of Kentucky Wildcats is huge. The older people pretty much all say worsh for wash which I hate and "I seen" is a common thing to say which also drives me crazy!

Anonymous said...

Fyi... the Derby is the FIRST Saturday in May. Everyone should go once but the real way to watch the Derby if you're a local is to be at a Derby party. Now the Oaks on the other hand... locals don't miss that day. It's the Friday before the first Saturday in May, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the first Friday in May.

Anonymous said...

Um it's not kentucky state wildcats it's university of Kentucky wildcats .

kyjetplane11 said...

I don't know why people are speaking to you so rudely. It seems to me that no matter the state people have different experiences. I am from Bowling Green and understand both the colorful horses I have seen in Louisville, and the crazy amount of cars abandoned on the side of the highway. Though you can get chili practically anywhere and basketball is actually the number one sport in Kentucky followed by football. The rest of the south is more for football but we Kentuckians like to shake things up. Being a big sweet tea drinker comes with how you are raised I believe. If you aren't from the south and thus not given from the time you turn two then you may not be as attached to it.

I find your post very funny and I can relate to quite a bit of it, but I do not necessarily have an accent and this is often pointed out to me. My dad is from California and my Mom from Southern Kentucky but I have neither accent. Though I can probably think of people pronounce things the way you say people do.